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01296 381111

Sian Sagoo

Sian Sagoo.

Sales Manager, Aylesbury Branch

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01296 381121

Richard Alexander

Richard Alexander.

Lettings Manager, Aylesbury Branch

If you're the tenant of a managed property at this branch and are looking to log a maintenance call or arrange an inspection:

Thameside Property Management

01344 408130

With close proximity to London, as well as the scenic countryside of Buckinghamshire, the market town of Aylesbury is popular with professionals and families alike.

 

Careful development in recent years has brought modern infrastructure without damaging the area’s historic charm. The largest town in the Aylesbury Vale, its vibrant history can be traced back to 650BC. Fortunately, the character of the ‘old town’ and many of the impressive sights remain intact. These include St Mary’s Church, the King’s Head Inn – once frequented by Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn – and the towering statue of John Hampden, which commemorates a local hero and influential leader in the English Civil War.

 

Charles Compton statue in Aylesbury

Charles Compton statue in Aylesbury

 

With that being said, Aylesbury still manages to compete with larger towns or cities, providing impressive facilities from contemporary shopping complexes to award-winning restaurants. For the health-conscious, there is a great choice of leisure centres offering swimming and other fitness facilities.

 

Nearby villages and hamlets provide a quieter atmosphere, surrounded by the rolling landscape of Buckinghamshire and the Chiltern Hills. In a county with one of the highest numbers of National Trust properties in the UK, there’s always an attraction or two worth exploring.

 

Finally, the first-rate educational establishments provide further motivation for families relocating to the area, as does the ongoing development. The regeneration project will create even more property choice, with both flats and housing estates planned.

 

Transportation

 

As an important commuter hub, trains to and from Aylesbury Station to London Marylebone are frequent. These are usually available five times per hour at peak times and take approximately one hour. The nearby station at Tring also provides a direct connection to London Euston, with a travel time of 40 minutes.

 

Travelling by car is just as convenient, with A roads leading to the M40, M25 and M1. Alternatively, for holidays and business trips, Aylesbury is only 40 minutes by car to Heathrow and London Luton airports.

 

Education

 

Aylesbury is home to a selection of renowned educational establishments, not to mention the other nearby schools of Buckinghamshire. Many of the state schools are among the top achievers in the south-east. This includes Aylesbury High School, which appeared at number 20 in the Telegraph’s summer 2014 GCSE results league table.

 

Aylesbury Grammar School and Sir Henry Floyd Grammar School both achieved a 98% success rate for students achieving five good GCSEs or more.

 

Higher education is equally impressive, including the recent development of University Campus Aylesbury Vale (UCAV). Following a £16.5 million project, this waterside complex provides state-of-the-art facilities to foster learning in future professionals and leaders.

 

Alternatively, students have the choice of Aylesbury College of Further Education, or the nearby University of Buckingham – the UK’s only independent university with a Royal Charter.

 

History

 

St Mary the Virgin Parish Church in Aylesbury

St Mary the Virgin Parish Church in Aylesbury

 

The rich and varied history of Aylesbury dates back to Anglo-Saxon times, when the region was considered a commercial centre. The market town was of major importance during this period and considered a stronghold due to its location linking traders from London to the south-west.

 

Aylesbury was named the county town of Buckinghamshire by Henry VIII back in 1529. Growth was to come throughout the following centuries as several industries flourished, from lace-making to silk production, printing and brewing. This development continued into the 19th century as newly established transportation links connected Aylesbury to London by rail and canal.

 

The population soared as infrastructure improved in the 20th century. The Stoke Mandeville Hospital opened its door in 1940, while the Aylesbury Technical College (now called Sir Henry Floyd Grammar School) and Grange School were soon to follow.

 

In 1942, Aylesbury was declared an overspill town for London, providing a haven for those seeking to escape the crowded capital. Leaving behind its image as a rural market town, Aylesbury became a sought-after location for those seeking close proximity to London.

 

Places of Interest

 

Buckinghamshire County Museum and Art Gallery

Buckinghamshire County Museum and Art Gallery

 

Aylesbury is a place of contrasts, where modern shopping areas sit alongside historic attractions and conservation areas. Whether you’re retired, starting a family or a young professional, thereare heaps of attractions in the region, such as:

  • Buckinghamshire County Museum and Art Gallery
  • Roald Dahl Children’s Gallery
  • King’s Head Inn
  • Waddesdon Manor
  • Claydon House
  • Stowe Landscape Garden
  • Aylesbury Waterside Theatre
  • Wendover Woods
  • Rogue Bowling Aylesbury
  • Aylesbury Tennis, Squash & Racketball Club
  • ODEON Aylesbury
  • Aqua Vale Swimming and Fitness Centre

 

How to get here

 

  • By road: Aylesbury can be reached from Junction 8a of the M40, taking the A418 and following signs for Aylesbury. Alternatively, for those travelling from Luton and the A5, approach via the A505 to Leighton Buzzard and take the A418 to Aylesbury town centre.
  • By rail: Aylesbury station operates main-line services connecting to major hubs within the UK.

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